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Home > The Intrepid Experience > Exhibits > British Airways Concorde
British Airways Concorde
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Join the Ranks of the Rich and Famous

The fastest Atlantic crossing by any Concorde occurred on February 7, 1996 and took only 2 hours, 52 minutes, and 59 seconds. This record-breaking plane — the Concorde Alpha Delta G-BOAD — is yours to explore at Intrepid Museum complex on Pier 86.

To preserve the Concorde, entry is limited to guided tour guests only. Tours are offered daily.
Click here to book a tour. The expanded 1 hour Concorde tour is only offered at 10:00am daily.  

NEW Concorde Experience
A new 20-minute experience takes guests inside Concorde’s first class cabin to learn about this technological marvel. Guests will also get an up-close look inside its sophisticated flight deck.

Visitor Safety: This experience requires navigating stairs leading to and from Concorde. Minimum age is 5.

General: $7 adults (13+) | seniors (65+ w/valid ID) | children (5–12)
Museum Members: $4

This new 20-minute Concorde experience is offered every 30 minutes beginning at 11:00am. This experience is not included with general admission and has limited availability. Tickets can be purchased online or onsite at the Museum box office or Information Desk. PURCHASE TICKETS
 
  Imagine the Power

The Concorde is a product of Anglo-French cooperation. When the Concorde entered Air France and British Airways transatlantic service in 1976, it was the only operational supersonic passenger transport in the world. With a crew of nine, the Concorde could fly at 1,350 mph (2,150 kph) at an altitude of 60,000 ft (18,181 m), high enough for its 100 passengers to see the curvature of the earth.
  Relive History

This aircraft, serial no. 100-010 (G-BOAD), first flew on August 25, 1976. Concordes crossed the Atlantic Ocean in under three hours, or less than half the time of any other jetliner flying that route even today. Protests from environmentalists prevented its supersonic use over the United States and limited airport operation. A crash upon takeoff in July 2000 grounded the fleet until 2001. The Concorde flew VIP passengers until 2003, when both airlines retired their fleets from service. This airplane is on loan from British Airways.